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HOW LONG DOES MATCHA STAY FRESH FOR?

Matcha tea lasts about one year on the shelf. If you have Matcha that has ‘expired’ we recommend baking with it. Once Matcha is opened, it really should be used up within three or four weeks — or, if we really want to push it, no longer than eight weeks to ensure optimum freshness, colour, and taste.

HOW TO PREPARE A CUP OF MATCHA TEA?

Place half a teaspoon of Matcha powder in your mug (use a fine sieve if you have one). Add a small amount of cold water and using a teaspoon mix to a paste. Add boiled water that has cooled for at least 5 minutes (to approx 80 degrees). Whisk with a drinks whisk (or stir well with a teaspoon).

Preparing your Matcha in a bowl:

As above, except use a Matcha whisk in a fast zig zag motion.
Tip: immerse your whisk in warm water before use. This softens the bamboo so there is less chance of breakage.

HOW DO I STORE MATCHA?

Once opened store away from heat, light and moisture. Keep the pack sealed if possible. Many people refrigerate their Matcha after opening. Ensure your container is airtight to keep moisture out.

HOW TO TASTE FOR THE BEST MATCHA TEA?

Step 1: See

Colour: Look for really vibrant green colour in the powder. The greener the better. Bad Matcha is yellow or brownish in tint.

Foam: After whisking your Matcha for about 8 seconds, examine the foam (or lack thereof). There should be lovely frothy bubbles on top (like an espresso).

Step 2: Smell

Aroma: High Quality Matcha has a fresh grassy smell. Bad Matcha will have a stale hay smell.

Step 3: Taste

Flavour: High Quality Matcha should have a smooth, clean taste. Bad Matcha will taste overly bitter and astringent.

Texture: High Quality Matcha is fine and silky on the tongue. Bad Matcha is coarse and gritty.

Body: High Quality Matcha is thick and creamy. Bad Matcha is thin and watery.

WHERE DOES THE BEST QUALITY MATCHA COME FROM?

It’s widely accepted that Matcha from Japan is the best. It starts with using high quality leaves, with stems and veins removed to reduce any bitter flavours. Then the leaves are stone ground to a fine powder in specially designed granite stone mills (non-traditional Matcha producers use equipment that can burn and therefore degrade the Matcha).

WHY IS CEREMONIAL GRADE MATCHA SO SPECIAL?

Ceremonial grade is more complex in taste and aroma due to higher concentration of amino acids. The flavour should be mellow and smooth with great depth and excellent aroma. You can often find less expensive culinary / cooking grade versions of the same producer’s Matcha, which can be less complex, earthier, and more astringent. This doesn’t necessarily mean cooking grade is unpleasant (We’ve tasted some good enough to sip on their own), but is usually better suited to mixing into smoothies, lattes, or cooking.